Stowers News

Uncovering new relationships and organizational principles in protein interaction networks

Mar 8 2017

KANSAS CITY, MOProteins, those basic components of cells and tissues, carry out many biological functions by working with partners in networks. The dynamic nature of these networks – where proteins interact with different partners at different times and in different cellular environments – can present a challenge to scientists who study them.

Possible key to regeneration found in planaria’s origins

Feb 13 2017

KANSAS CITY, MOA new report from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research chronicles the embryonic origins of planaria, providing new insight into the animal's remarkable regenerative abilities.

New finding reveals battle behind gene expression

Dec 15 2016

KANSAS CITY, MO The complex process regulating gene expression is often compared to following a recipe. Miss a genetic ingredient, or add it in the wrong order, and you could have a disaster on your hands.

New research from Stowers Institute for Medical Research suggests the process may be more like a battle between two opposing genetic forces rather than a step-wise assembly of ingredients.

Research points to Orb2 as a physical substrate for memory strength, retention

Dec 5 2016

KANSAS CITY, MOHow do you remember what happened today in the weeks and months that follow? Researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have answered a piece of that question in a recent study.

Shifts in the microbiome impact tissue repair and regeneration

Aug 29 2016

KANSAS CITY, MOResearchers at the Stowers Institute have established a definitive link between the makeup of the microbiome, the host immune response, and an organism’s ability to heal itself.

Researchers discover a key molecular signal that shapes regeneration in planarian stem cells

Aug 11 2016

KANSAS CITY, MO Many living creatures possess exceptional abilities that set them apart from other species. Cheetahs can run up to 60 miles per hour; ants can lift 100 times their body weight; flatworms can regrow amputated body parts. Scientists have spent decades studying the mechanisms that drive such remarkable feats, with the hopes that any secrets they uncover might lead to new perspectives in human biology and new ways to enhance health and ameliorate disease.

Similarities unite three distinct gene mutations of Treacher Collins Syndrome

Jul 22 2016

KANSAS CITY, MOScientists at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have reported a detailed description of how function-impairing mutations in polr1c and polr1d genes cause Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS), a rare congenital craniofacial development disorder that affects an estimated 1 in 50,000 live births.

Robert Krumlauf elected to the National Academy of Sciences

May 4 2016

KANSAS CITY, MOThe Stowers Institute for Medical Research is pleased to announce that Scientific Director and Investigator Robert Krumlauf, Ph.D., has been elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) for his distinguished and continuing achievements in original scientific research. Membership in the NAS is considered one of the highest honors given to a scientist in the United States. Krumlauf will be inducted into the NAS next April during its 154th annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

Researchers generate whole-genome map of fruit fly genetic recombination

Mar 17 2016

KANSAS CITY, MOAs eggs and sperm, or gametes, are formed during meiosis, chromosomes carrying the genetic material from each parent must find their partners, pair, and exchange parts of their DNA. This recombination is an important driving force behind genetic variability and evolution, but most importantly, it ensures that chromosomes move properly during the subsequent divisions that form these gametes.

Researchers use mouse model to study craniofacial disorders

craniofacial disorders study
Feb 25 2016

KANSAS CITY, MOResearchers from the laboratory of Paul Trainor, Ph.D., at the Stowers Institute of Medical Research have developed an effective and reliable technique for studying high-arched palate using a mouse model. The methodology could expand research into the genetic aspects of this craniofacial abnormality.

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